MYRSO Glossary of Terms

On the journey to wellness we are going to be faced with a few words and acronyms that might not make sense just yet.

Here is a simple glossary to better guide the understanding of your medicine, and the jargon commonly used in cannabis.


Bioavailability - The proportion of a drug or other substance which enters the circulation when introduced into the body and so is able to have an active effect.

CB-1 Receptor - Cannabinoid receptor type 1, also known as cannabinoid receptor 1, is a G protein-coupled cannabinoid receptor that in humans is encoded by the CNR1 gene. The human CB1 receptor is expressed in the peripheral nervous system and central nervous system.

CB-2 Receptor - CB2 receptors cause the massive range of cannabis’ medicinal properties because they are responsible for reducing inflammation, one of the primary causes for a host of conditions and diseases.  High concentrations of CB2 receptors are located in the gastrointestinal system, immune system, spleen, tonsils, thymus gland, and brain.  Because of their location and their ability to reduce inflammation, cannabinoids with high binding affinity to CB2 receptors have demonstrated remarkable efficacy in the treatment of conditions like Crohn’s disease.

CBC - Cannabichromene   is non-intoxicating, so it doesn’t produce a euphoric high like THC. The reason it is non-intoxicating is because it binds poorly to CB1 canabinoid receptors in the brain. It does however bind well to our actual pain receptors lessening the severity of our pain and discomfort.

CBD - Cannabidiol is a naturally occurring cannabinoid constituent of cannabis. It was discovered in 1940 and initially thought not to be non-psychoactive. Has been linked to helping seizures, anxiety, and inflamation.

CBG - Cannabigerol is a non-intoxicating cannabinoid, meaning it doesn’t produce the “highs” that are synonymous with THC. Because it is present in low levels (usually less than 1%) in most cannabis strains, CBG is considered a minor cannabinoid although being the starting cannabinoid for THC and CBD.

CBN - Cannabinol is a canabinoid found in cannabis that provides sleepy and relaxing effects.

Decarboxylation - Sounds dangerous and scientific, but it's actually a good thing! It helps unlocks the full medicinal potential of other cannabinoids, such as CBDs, CBNs, and CBGs everytime you use cannabis.

Dosing - A specified quantity of a therapeutic agent, such as a drug, prescribed to be taken at one time or at stated intervals.

Full Spectrum - the term used to describe medicine that utilizes the whole plant for all the therapeutic values and effects

Endocanabbinoid system - the system discovered inside of the human body responsible for our homeostasis. comprised of at least two receptors. CB1 and CB2

Entourage effect -  The feeling achieved by utilizing the therapeutic properties of the cannabinoids and terpenes together.

Ethanol -  FDA approved solvent created from corn. The only solvent used in the creation of Myrso

Phytocanabinoid -  cannabinoids found in nature, like in your cannabis.

Rotovap - The machine we use to create our Myrso

R.S.O - A abbreviation for Rick Simpson, a cancer survivor and fighter who developed medicine using the essential oils of the cannabis plant.

Tolerance - Ones susceptibility to the effects of cannabis, it's endocanabinoids, and is used often as a determinant for appropriate dosing.

THC - Tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) is one of at least 114 cannabinoids identified to cannabis. THC is the principal psychoactive constituent of cannabis.

THCV - Tetrahydrocannabivarin is a cannabinoid found in some flower strains that provide energy and can act as an appetite supression.

Terpene - Terpenes are a large and diverse class of organic compounds, produced by a variety of plants and by some insects. They often have a strong odor and may protect the plants that produce them by deterring herbivores and by attracting predators and parasites of herbivores.

Synergy - The interaction or cooperation of two or more organizations, substances, or other agents to produce a combined effect greater than the sum of their separate effects.



Jeremiah Sasko